Delaware Citizens Opposed to the Death Penalty

DCODP’s website offers information, news, events, and action alerts for the purpose of abolishing Delaware’s death penalty.

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2017 Annual Meeting: Reimagining Justice: How Restorative Justice Satisfies the Needs of Victims, Offenders, and Communities

Join us for a short business meeting followed by a presentation:

Reimagining Justice: How Restorative Justice Satisfies the  Needs of Victims, Offenders, and Communities

Monday, November 27th, 2017

6:45 pm Business Meeting, 7:00 pm Speaker

Brandywine Hundred Library, 1300 Foulk Rd, Wilmington, DE 19803

Crime causes injury to people and communities. Restorative Justice offers principles and practices to address the harms that have occurred, the needs that have arisen from those harms, and who is obligated to meet those needs. Barbie Fischer is Executive Director of Restorative Encounters, a non-profit whose aim is to encourage taking responsibility for our actions and working toward healing all affected by crime. Ms. Fischer has over 15 years of experience in restorative justice, working in community and program development with various organizations around the world.

The annual meeting is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, call 302-379-0488 or visit http://www.enddeathpenaltyde.org.

Delaware Citizens Opposed to the Death Penalty is a restorative justice project of Pacem in Terris.

DPIC Study Finds No Evidence that Death Penalty Deters Murder or Protects Police

DPIC_Study_Does_the_Death_Penalty_Deter_MurderA Death Penalty Information Center analysis of U.S. murder data from 1987 through 2015 has found no evidence that the death penalty deters murder or protects police. Instead, the evidence shows that murder rates, including murders of police officers, are consistently higher in death-penalty states than in states that have abolished the death penalty. And far from experiencing increases in murder rates or open season on law enforcement, the data show that states that have abolished the death penalty since 2000 have the lowest rates of police officers murdered in the line of duty and that killings of police account for a much smaller percentage of murders in those states.

For further information, click here.

Volunteer Opportunity at Newark Community Day – 9/17/17

Part of the mission of Delaware Citizens Opposed to the Death Penalty is education. We need your help at Newark Community Day to spread the message that Delaware needs to remain free of the death penalty. Join us for an hour or two to hand out materials or help visitors take a poll. It’s easy and fun.

Sunday, 9/17/17, 11am – 4pm, University of Delaware Green, Newark, Delaware.

For further information about Newark Community Day, click here.

To notify us that you can volunteer or if you have questions, click here.

Review of Death Penalty Reinstatement Bill HB 125 Postponed

Senate Majority Leader Margaret Rose Henry recently stated that the discussion of House Bill 125 to reinstate Delaware’s death penalty would be postponed until the General Assembly reconvenes in January 2018.  “Of all the issues we’ve dealt with in my time in the General Assembly, there have been few as emotional for both sides as the debate surrounding the death penalty,” said Senate Majority Leader Margaret Rose Henry. D-Wilmington East. “Efforts to repeal the death penalty were ongoing for more than three years before the courts stepped in so I think it’s obvious we need to proceed deliberately and have a full vetting of this issue in the Senate before we consider reinstating capital punishment.” To see the full article, click here.

HB 125 has been assigned to the House Judiciary Committee of which Senator Henry is Chair. It has already passed in the full House. Delaware’s death penalty was declared unconstitutional by the Delaware Supreme Court on August 2, 2016 for violating the sixth amendment of the United States Constitution. The new bill proposes to change the previous statute so that juries must be unanimous and judges are prohibited from overriding jury recommendations. These changes may satisfy Constitutional requirements, but don’t do anything to address the other flaws in Delaware’s death penalty. These flaws include its racist application, failure to improve public safety, high risk of executing an innocent, costing more than life without parole, and a 73% failure rate. For further information about the flaws in Delaware’s death penalty, click here.